Reviews

‘The Father’: A Devastating Study on Losing Oneself

Florian Zeller’s The Father is more than just your typical family drama. Family drama isn’t even an apt description for it.  Anne (Olivia Colman) visits her 80-year-old father, Anthony (Anthony Hopkins), who’s living in an apartment alone in London. He had just chased off the recent carer she’s hired for him after accusing her of… Continue reading ‘The Father’: A Devastating Study on Losing Oneself

Reviews

‘Concrete Cowboy’: On Fatherhood and Belonging

Any onscreen portrayal of a father-child relationship pales in comparison to the nuanced nature of fatherhood. Fathers in the media are often depicted in different ways, ranging from abusive to caring to devoted. However, this varied depiction is few and far in between. Black fatherhood in particular suffers from the stereotype of being absent in… Continue reading ‘Concrete Cowboy’: On Fatherhood and Belonging

Reviews

‘Sound of Metal’ is a Sonic Portrait of Accepting One’s Post-Normal

Pre-pandemic, we were attuned to our regular rhythms, completely clueless that in just a whiff, they would be interrupted forever. Now, as we’re still soaked in a period of uncertainty, Sound of Metal, a non-pandemic film, shakes us and pokes us with the question, “How are you accepting the fact that things will never be… Continue reading ‘Sound of Metal’ is a Sonic Portrait of Accepting One’s Post-Normal

Reviews

‘Definition Please’: A Charming Debut on Sibling Love and Identity

Sujata Day’s charming debut tells the story of Monica Chowdry (played by Day herself) and her family in the Pennsylvanian suburbs. Monica spends her days taking care of her mother and struggling with the failure of living up to her potential since her big spelling bee win. She occasionally teaches a bunch of kids whose… Continue reading ‘Definition Please’: A Charming Debut on Sibling Love and Identity

Reviews

Mapping the Displacement of Innocence in ‘Bullet-Laced Dreams’

The archipelagic structure of our country cultivates a sense of displacement as the mainstream favors the metropolis. Communities from other regions are not given the same favorable coverage, with the plight of the indigenous communities often unheard. This has led to most tribes migrating to the city as well, to gain safety and to have… Continue reading Mapping the Displacement of Innocence in ‘Bullet-Laced Dreams’

Reviews

‘Ride or Die’ Isn’t the Sapphic Runaway Film of Our Dreams

There are two ways in which sapphic stories are portrayed on screen. A lot goes into these categories, mind you, but let's simplify them: good sapphic films and bad sapphic films. Ride or Die somehow straddles the line, but it tips over to undesirable at best and downright problematic at worst. Adapted from Gunjou, a… Continue reading ‘Ride or Die’ Isn’t the Sapphic Runaway Film of Our Dreams