Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2022: ‘Resurrection’—A Frightening Mess of a Movie

After Rebecca Hall’s stunning directorial debut Passing premiered at Sundance last year, she is back at the festival, starring in Andrew Semans’ Resurrection. Hall plays Margaret, a career-driven woman and mollycoddling single mother of teenage Abbie (Grace Kaufman). Behind a seemingly pristine life, Margaret’s façade starts to crack when she sees a man from her… Continue reading Sundance 2022: ‘Resurrection’—A Frightening Mess of a Movie

Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2022: ‘The Exiles’—A Look Into the Eccentric Christine Choy

In a documentary filmmaking course, my professor always said that documentarians are always obscure compared to their counterparts in narrative filmmaking. Ask a person if they know a director and they will give you familiar names like Scorsese, Tarantino, Nolan, and many others known for their narrative films. Out of the names I’ve mentioned, Scorsese… Continue reading Sundance 2022: ‘The Exiles’—A Look Into the Eccentric Christine Choy

Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2022: ‘Hatching’—A Beautiful Take on the Body and Creature Horror Genre

After the successful festival run of Julia Ducournau’s Titane—even winning the highly regarded Palme d’Or in a Cannes run by the eccentric Spike Lee—body horror is gaining resurgence within mainstream audiences as it gives insight into our fixation on how far human bodies can endure. Hanna Bergholm’s Hatching, elicited mixed responses as expected in most… Continue reading Sundance 2022: ‘Hatching’—A Beautiful Take on the Body and Creature Horror Genre

Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2022: ‘After Yang’ – A Solemn Take on the Humanity of the Posthuman

Five years after Kogonada’s debut Columbus, he’s back at Sundance with his sophomore feature fresh from its Cannes premiere last July. In a more ambitious artistic endeavor, Kogonada continues to improve himself with After Yang. After Yang is adapted from Alexander Weinstein’s short story “Saying Goodbye to Yang”, a sci-fi tale set in the future… Continue reading Sundance 2022: ‘After Yang’ – A Solemn Take on the Humanity of the Posthuman

Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2022: ‘Leonor Will Never Die’ – A Love Letter to Filipino Cinema

In Martika Ramirez Escobar's director statement, she talks about a famous action star without any political background nabbing the most powerful position in the country. She reflects on how this ties to the Filipino people’s love for movies, especially action. Decades later, a macho man that seemed straight out of “bakbakan” (fighting) films became the… Continue reading Sundance 2022: ‘Leonor Will Never Die’ – A Love Letter to Filipino Cinema

Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2022: ‘When You Finish Saving the World’ – Jesse Eisenberg’s Directorial Debut is a Thin Mother-Son Drama

In an adaptation of his five-hour audio play for Audible, Jesse Eisenberg gives us a look into Evelyn Katz (Julianne Moore), who runs a domestic violence shelter, and her son Ziggy (Finn Wolfhard), a teen preoccupied with internet fame. As Eisenberg introduces his film to an all-virtual Sundance audience, yet again for the second year… Continue reading Sundance 2022: ‘When You Finish Saving the World’ – Jesse Eisenberg’s Directorial Debut is a Thin Mother-Son Drama

Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2022: ‘Fresh’ – A Fun and Horrifying Take on the Dangers of Dating

The dating world is now more complex than ever thanks to the emergence of dating apps. You will find creeps, friends with benefits, or someone who you’ll date for maybe a month, but only if you’re lucky.  Such is the case for Noa, played by Daisy Edgar-Jones fresh from her Normal People fame, who is… Continue reading Sundance 2022: ‘Fresh’ – A Fun and Horrifying Take on the Dangers of Dating

Festivals, Reviews

TIFF 2021: ‘The Electrical Life of Louis Wain’—a Playful Take on the Tortured Cat Painter Genius

Cats have been worshipped for centuries. At the beginning of the 20th century, paintings of anthropomorphized large-eyed cats were in circulation. Cats, then still a bit of a mystery, became the mainstream, all thanks to a man named Louis Wain (Benedict Cumberbatch).  The Electrical Life of Louis Wain follows Wain’s journey from being the sole… Continue reading TIFF 2021: ‘The Electrical Life of Louis Wain’—a Playful Take on the Tortured Cat Painter Genius

Reviews

TIFF 2021: ‘Last Night in Soho’—Stylish yet Clumsy

After a successful milieu of comedic films (and an action), director Edgar Wright now dips his toes in psychological horror. Last Night in Soho is Wright’s first try with the subgenre, a film set in the beloved titular London district known for being the center of entertainment. Soho follows Elle (Thomasin McKenzie), an aspiring fashion… Continue reading TIFF 2021: ‘Last Night in Soho’—Stylish yet Clumsy

Festivals, Reviews

TIFF 2021: ‘Scarborough’—A Stirring Look in this Diverse Toronto Neighbourhood

The Canadian film scene is a mixed bag full of stories from different walks of life, though most of the recent ones are stories about bourgeois struggle. Then came Scarborough, an adaptation of the 2017 book by Filipino-Canadian author Catherine Hernandez. This captivating book, which received so much praise and prizes, is translated onscreen by… Continue reading TIFF 2021: ‘Scarborough’—A Stirring Look in this Diverse Toronto Neighbourhood