Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2021: ‘The World to Come’—Another White Lesbian Period Film

Spoilers ahead. The World to Come is another white lesbian period film. After the success of Portrait of a Lady on Fire and the mixed reception of Ammonite, it seems this subgenre of LGBT romance found an audience that would constantly eat it up (including me!). Directed by Norwegian director Mona Fastvold, who co-wrote the… Continue reading Sundance 2021: ‘The World to Come’—Another White Lesbian Period Film

Reviews

On ‘Minari’ and Gently Cultivating a Heavy Story

Minari is a moving piece of poetry with an ordinary story about ordinary people: people who had to upheave their roots for the hopes of a fruitful life. Like what the film’s executive producer Steven Yeun said, the immigrant experience does not need to be romanticized. In this semi-autobiographical film by South Korean-American writer/director Lee… Continue reading On ‘Minari’ and Gently Cultivating a Heavy Story

Festivals, Reviews

Sundance 2021: ‘Censor’ is a Campy Gore Galore that Doesn’t Quite Find its Footing

Welsh filmmaker Prano Bailey-Bond’s debut Censor is an homage to the 80's and the infamous “video nasties” of the era in Thatcher’s Britain. Enid (Niamh Algar), a film censor, is a workaholic with a meticulous eye for detail. Her job is to protect British audiences from the ”nasties,” as some critics connect these films to… Continue reading Sundance 2021: ‘Censor’ is a Campy Gore Galore that Doesn’t Quite Find its Footing

Reviews

‘One Night in Miami’ and the Debate Between Idealism and Realism

Last December, multiple award-winning actress Regina King made her directorial debut with One Night in Miami, a speculative historical film based on Kemp Powers’ 2013 play of the same name. One Night focuses on the real-life encounter that Malcolm X, Muhammad Ali, Sam Cooke, and Jim Brown all had on February 25, 1964, fictionalizing the… Continue reading ‘One Night in Miami’ and the Debate Between Idealism and Realism

Reviews

‘Happiest Season’: On Coming Out with Fresh Narratives for a Queer Audience

Holiday romantic comedies in mainstream media have always been made for a heterosexual audience. Naturally, last year’s release of Clea DuVall’s Happiest Season, starring Kristen Stewart and Mackenzie Davis as a lesbian couple, generated both praise and backlash for its portrayal and placement of the LGBT in this genre. LGBT representation in mainstream media has… Continue reading ‘Happiest Season’: On Coming Out with Fresh Narratives for a Queer Audience

Reviews

‘Soul’ is a near-death (and near-life) experience

Pixar goes meta by successfully merging philosophy and jazz to create a vibrant and soul-warming animated feature film called Soul, its most ambitious work to date. Released last Christmas on Disney+, Soul gave the perfect holiday gift of existential bliss (and crisis) to its viewers. The film follows a jazz pianist named Joe Gardner (voiced… Continue reading ‘Soul’ is a near-death (and near-life) experience

Reviews

‘Nimic’: Mimicry at Its Most Discomforting

Yorgos Lanthimos has this eerily satisfying way of creating a dystopian atmosphere around the concepts of human behavior. If you have been following his work, you know how he can effortlessly bend his audience and turn them into hollow but enlightened souls just as the credits roll. If you have an affinity for dark comedies… Continue reading ‘Nimic’: Mimicry at Its Most Discomforting

Reviews

‘Wonder Woman 1984’: An Empty, Tone-Deaf Spectacle

There’s something to be said about the state of cinema last year. With the industry scrambling to adjust to the pandemic, gone were the corporate blockbusters inhabiting the big screens and the usual blockbuster noise making rounds on your social media feed. For a year as long as 2020, the months without these behemoth blockbusters… Continue reading ‘Wonder Woman 1984’: An Empty, Tone-Deaf Spectacle